Dr Tommy Wood

This week Mikki gets to chat to Dr Tommy Wood, about brain health, the problem with the food guidelines and his ancestral approach to health and wellbeing. We discuss: · His journey into Ancestral Health · Principles of ancestral health · Where the dietary guidelines get it wrong · Potential issues around liquid oils (and significance of this for infants) · Omega 3 importance for brain · The developing brain and risk of long term harm – what do we know? · Important things for the ageing and a healthy brain · Importance of protein for optimal health and ageing · Is coffee (or other plants) killing you? · Carnivore movement and glucose response · Glucose response in general · Tommy’s diet and training · Importance of typical habits v being super rigorous · Supplement recommendations

Tommy Wood is part of the research faculty at the University of Washington (UW) in the Department of Pediatrics. His research focuses on ways to increase resilience of, and treat injury of, the developing brain. He has a bachelor's degree in biochemistry from the University of Cambridge, a medical degree from the University of Oxford, and a PhD in physiology and neuroscience from the University of Oslo. In addition to his role as a faculty at UW, he serves as President of Physicians for Ancestral Health, and is on the scientific advisory board of Hintsa Performance. Alongside his career in medicine and research, he has invested time in developing easily-accessible methods with which to track human health, performance, and longevity. He has published and spoken on multiple topics surrounding functional and ancestral approaches to health, including examining the root causes of multiple sclerosis and insulin resistance. He uses his experiences in coaching and competing in rowing, CrossFit, powerlifting, and ultra-endurance racing to inform his day-to-day interaction with clients looking to achieve long-term health and performance.


Tommy can be found at https://www.drragnar.com/
IG: @drtommywood

Studies
Swedish study SAT v PUFA and muffins: https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/63/7/2356
Brisk walking and hippocampal volume: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425252/