Achieve better ageing with Dr Charles Brenner Ph.D.

This week Mikki speaks to Dr. Charles Brenner, a research pioneer in the area of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). NAD+ is fundamental to the creation of energy in every cell of your body. NAD+ regulates pivotal cellular processes that are key to looking and feeling our best.

At Dartmouth College (2004) Dr. Brenner discovered nicotinamide riboside (NR) to be a vital precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Dr Brenner explains the significance of NAD and why he believes supplementation with NR could help us “age better.” He also elaborates on why he refuses to describe NR as “miraculous or magic” and we talk about the ‘anti-aging’ claims in the marketing of human longevity.

NAD+ is fundamental to the creation of energy in every cell of your body.  NAD+ regulates pivotal cellular processes that are key to looking and feeling our best.

In 2007 Dr. Brenner’s lab discovered a second pathway by which NR is converted to NAD+ and showed that NR can extend the lifespan of yeast cells.

 Nicotinamide riboside (NR) is converted by the body into nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) which is an essential molecule found in every living cell and plays a significant role in energy production, regulation of the circadian rhythm and cognitive function. 

It’s received a lot of attention since its discovery (and Dr Brenner was responsible for the NAD+ pathway discovery)  with many claims to how it helps improve overall health and longevity. 

Dr. Charles Brenner is one of the world’s leading authorities on the biochemistry behind NR and its potential to extend life in some organisms. Dr. Brenner was the Roy J. Carver Chair and Head of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa and founding co-director of the University of Iowa Obesity Initiative. He is also chief scientific adviser to Chromadex, a California-based company behind the NR supplement, Tru Niagen. 
Now, Charles Brenner is the Alfred E Mann Family Foundation Chair in Diabetes and Cancer Metabolism in the Department of Diabetes & Cancer Metabolism at the City of Hope, a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center and national leader in advancing research and treatment protocols. His laboratory focuses on disturbances in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), the central catalyst of metabolism, in diseases and conditions of metabolic stress.
 
 He continues to research how the NAD system is dysregulated as a function of postpartum, coronavirus infection, inflammatory conditions, diabesity and specific malignancies with the dual goals of defining mechanisms of biological regulation and developing safe preventative and therapeutic interventions for people.